Today (Wednesday 23rd September) sees the launch of the ninth Cask Ale Report, which takes the temperature of the cask ale market in the UK every year.

Written by beer guru Pete Brown and supported by Cask Marque the report is compiled using data from the British Beer and Pub Association and CGA Strategy, alongside exclusive research by You Gov and CAMRA.

To save you the time and effort required to read the entire report, we've distilled the report into some key numbers for you, jusr scroll down. You're welcome!

Cask.Ale.Week.2

0.2 per cent
growth in cask ale volume over the last 12-months, a small but significant growth for the category, particularly as the total beer market declined 0.2 percent over the same period. The category also managed a 1.6 per cent increase in value through 2014 – well ahead of inflation

57 per cent
of all draught ale bought in the on-trade is cask ale, accounting for 17 per cent of all on-trade beer sales.

£1.8bn
is the total market value of cask ale, which represents a whopping a 29 per cent increase on just four years ago. It is estimated that the category will be worth some £2.3bn by 2020

70 per cent 

of UK pubs now serve cask ale and more pubs are stocking more ales – 65 per cent stock between one and three, 22.2 per cent stock between three and six and 11.9 per cent stock seven or more cask beers.

4
new breweries are opening per week in the UK, bringing the total number of British breweries to a satisfying 1,700 and by the time I've finished writing this article, there'll probably be even more.

£967
what each cask ale drinker spends per year in the pub, on average. This outstrips non-cask drinkers who spend £653, spirits drinkers who spend £667 and wine drinkers, who cough up a mere £593 on average

37 per cent
of cask ale drinkers are on Twitter, and so should you be if you want to connect with these valuable customers. To find out how check out our #pubsgetonline campaign at www.inapub.co.uk/pubsgetonline

42 per cent

of the population have never tried cask ale. 17 per cent of them say it's because it's "too bitter" for them - but if they haven't tried it, how do they know?