When 18-year-old Trish Partridge plucked up the courage to enter Newport Pagnell's "party pub" for the first time, she had no idea how her life was about to change.

On that night out in the Buckinghamshire town she was simply hoping for fun with friends at the popular Coachmakers Arms.

She did not expect to meet the man she would marry in a place that would become her home and her business.

Fast-forward a few years and Trish and Jonny Smith, by this point happily married with two kids, moved into the very pub where their teenage romance began.

"This was always the place Jonny came to have a drink. It came up on the market, the kids are not babies any more and we wanted to do something different, so this was it," she explains.

It was a big decision for the couple, who had never run a pub before (Jonny was a builder and Trish a full-time mum). As they approach the end of their first year at the pub, Trish says they have learnt a lot.

"It was very difficult at the beginning but we had a lot of support," she says. "We wouldn't have been able to do it without that."

Support came from various sources including landlord Punch Taverns and new business development manager Charlie Carroll, who was at the pub every week for the first six months.

Her advice and help as the couple settled in and oversaw a £125,000 refurb proved to be a great comfort.

"She gave me lots of tasks, which was tough but really helped me. The support was intense in that first period following launch," says Trish.

Charlie helped them learn the ropes and ensure their business plan became a reality.

And so far it has worked, with turnover exceeding expectations. Live entertainment and events have been a cornerstone of the success so far.

"This is, always was and always will be a party pub," says Trish. "It is known for Friday and Saturday nights and being quite lively. We focus on that and making sure there are good deals for people and plenty for them to come and see."

Open mic nights, live bands, Halloween, discos and a beer festival have all worked. Karaoke was less of a hit and Trish admits the food offer still requires some fine-tuning.

"We had a big menu and we cut it down," she says. "There was a lot of waste in the fridges, so we have decided to just do hot bar snacks all day."

Having run the pub for almost a year, Trish accepts she still has a lot to learn but feels much more comfortable than she did 12 months ago.

"It has taken a while but I do now feel like 'yes, I can do this'," she says.

Long may the pub romance continue.

TRISH'S TIPS FROM YEAR ONE IN BUSINESS

DON'T WORRY TOO MUCH
about the opinions of customers who think they know how to run a pub. Trust your own judgement or listen to those in the business

FIND TIME FOR FAMILY AND YOURSELF
You will burn out quickly if you don't and the household will get affected

TAKE AS MANY COURSES AS YOU CAN
Learn the fundamentals of running a pub – from prices to pouring a pint to managing a team and a cellar

MANAGE YOUR MONEY WISELY
Pubs come with a lot of bills, keep on top of the business and domestic outgoings. You don't want to overstretch yourself

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS
Social media is great for this — you can put up an offer or event and get an instant reaction