Inapub takes you on a journey through the best seaside pubs across Britain.

 

The Old Neptune - Whitstable, Kent

 

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You can't get much more seaside than the "Neppy" – this delightfully ramshackle pub sits on the pebble beach at Whitstable.

It was washed away twice in the 19th century, and the current building was erected in 1897 using timber reclaimed from the original construction.

We can't think of a better metaphor for the resilience of the pub trade, nor a more atmospheric spot for a pint of Whistable Bay and a portion of whitebait.

 

The Old Forge - Inverie, Knoydart, Scotland

 

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With no roads in or out and accessible only by a seven-mile sea crossing or a 15-mile back-country hike, The Old Forge needs to give people a reason to visit.

If the stunning location on the loch weren't enough, there's also the seafood, the whiskies and the "bring your own instruments, or borrow ours" music policy.

When Inapub visited a few years ago we found it well worth the walk.

 

The Pandora Inn - Falmouth, Cornwall

 

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You can actually dine on the water here, with tables set out on a pontoon for patrons to enjoy local seafood and cream teas.

The pontoon also serves as a prime crabbing ground for kids, with crab lines available from the bar.

 

The Anchor Inn - Seatown, Dorset

 

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Perched just above the shingle beach and blessed by picture-perfect sunsets, The Anchor holds its own in the Jurassic coast, an area blessed with outstanding natural beauty and a plethora of excellent traditional pubs.

Overnight guests can let the sound of the waves lull them to sleep.

 

South Beach Bar & Grill - Tenby, Pembrokeshire

 

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Brains' development on the beachfront opened in 2012, offering spectacular sea views and al fresco dining.

 

The Anchor Inn - Morston, Norfolk

 

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Possibly the only pub in the country with a separate counter to book seal-watching trips.

Formerly a haunt of smugglers, these days it is frequented by destination diners who come for its renowned seafood.

 

The Coastguard - St Margaret's Bay, Dover, Kent

 

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Britain's closest pub to France has a maritime look, with a lighthouse style fascia and boat-shaped planters and lifebelts against the famous white cliffs.

 

The Ty Coch Inn - Porthdinllaen, Gwynedd

 

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Named the third-best beach bar in the world a few years back, The Ty Coch is accessible by a mile walk over the beach.

Among the services it offers is a defibrillator for anyone needing emergency assistance in its remote location, but hopefully the varied beer selection and hearty fare will be more the kind of thing you're looking for.

 

The Marisco Tavern - Lundy

 

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Marooned in the middle of the Bristol Channel, Lundy's only pub is the only building on the island to have lighting after the generators shut down for the night.

 

The Ship Inn - Low Newton, Northumberland

 

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Drinkers can hear the seals calling from the rocks as they sup on Ship Hop Ale and Sandcastles at Dawn from the pub's own brewery just across the road.