"Maybe it's only when you spend so much time touring the world that you realise just how special the British pub is."

When we're on tour, cask ale is one of the main things I miss. That's one reason why I was delighted to work with Robinson's to create Trooper.

Their heritage and Iron Maiden's global reach has enabled it to be one of the UK's premier ambassadors of British Ale – it's now doing good business in 50 different countries.

Maybe initially the band played a big part in introducing it to people, but Iron Maiden fans wouldn't drink a duff beer just because we asked them to. They have told us they like Trooper's flavour and balance and it has now passed our wildest expectations.

This proves to me, not that it needed proof, that British ale is a drink with global appeal.

Maybe we forgot that a decade or so ago, when ale seemed a bit dog-eared and old-fashioned. But now, cask ale is regaining its rightful place on the bar, claiming back its birthright as the very DNA of a uniquely British tradition.

It is great to read in the Cask Report that cask is on track to account for one in five beers in pubs by 2020, and it is interesting to see that cask ale drinkers – proper pub regulars – put almost twice as much money over the bar as other people.

Maybe it's only when you spend so much time touring the world that you realise just how special the British pub is. This report shows that, by boosting pubs' profits, cask ale is playing a vital role in helping this national institution not just survive, but also thrive.

I'll drink to that - wherever I am!

Cheers