There's a point when something goes from being niche and cool to mainstream and everyone wants to start giving it a bit of a kicking.

It happens to bands, brands (Stella Artois knows about this), celebrities and pretty much everything that has had a chunk of success.

It's the British way of course. Build something up to a point and then smash it back into its place when it starts getting omnipresent or a bit too big for its boots.

Right now, it feels a bit like that for the craft beer scene.

For example, in a recent interview, chef Anthony Bourdain hit out craft beer drinkers and defended his preference for mainstream lagers. He suggested that bars should be about "getting a bit buzzed" rather than people analysing their beers.

 

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I know where he is coming from. I love the fact that the beer scene has become more varied and interesting and that there is more choice for pub goers. However, that doesn't mean that what I am drinking will ever be the main focus of my time spent socialising.

And sometimes, I'm not embarrassed to say, a pint of something cold and easy to drink hits the spot.

I certainly don't want to spend my night out talking about what I'm drinking.

Going to a pub is more about the people you are with and the experience you have. Your drink is part of this, but so is the conversation, the hospitality you receive, the music, the food, the style and general upkeep of the building you go to, and the prices you pay.

Beer can be a very pleasant part of a social occasion but that alone is far from enough.

There's also an element of the Emperor's New Clothes which is highlighted in the clip at the top of this story that has been doing the rounds on social media.

This isn't the first time the craft beer scene has been mocked. The Craft Wanker has been doing this on Twitter for years.

 

 

 

It just feels like now the mocking is louder and coming from outside the industry. Poking fun at the snobbery around craft is also becoming mainstream.

Perhaps a defining moment was when the co-founders of BrewDog, one of the driving forces behind the UK craft scene, accepted their MBEs. That was hardly the punk thing to do was it?

The self-appointed kings of craft have become more mainstream, which is inevitable when you have had the success and growth strategy they have had. They are a big brand now.

Meanwhile, mainstream has started to fight back. Established beers such as Pedigree have overhauled their looks and are talking proudly about their heritage and connections with their communities.

Sessionability is again becoming a word to be proud of for a beer rather than a euphemism for bland.

Most people who go to a pub want a second or third pint, usually of the beer they started with.

We've had the craft beer revolution are we witnessing the craft beer rebellion?